Experience Nature through your Food Ebook

Introducing a new ebook we think you’re REALLY going to like!

Ebook cover sm.
This delightfully engaging ebook invites connection with nature and inspires transformation and adventures of the heart.

I co-authored and published this ebook with Angelyn Whitmeyer of IdentifyThatPlant. It’s been a very exciting project to work on, and besides the end result of a beautiful, inspiring book, we have also created New Earthlings Press.

With a beautiful ebook format,  we offer 42 guided experiences to help you become more aware and to take inspired personal action to re-forge your connection between nature and food.

Joyfully, we are donating 10% of the sales proceeds of this ebook to A Promise of Health, to support their pioneering homeopathic healthcare model, delivering sustainable and effective care to Mexico’s medically underserved indigenous people.

Will you help us make this a wildly successful venture?

Please visit New Earthlings Press for reviews and more info about the book and the press, and to purchase your copy of the ebook. Do you know someone who loves nature (and/or food) and might be interested in this ebook? Please share this blogpost with them, and also post on Facebook, Linked In, Pinterest and any other social media sites you participate in. Also, we welcome your ideas regarding who might enjoy and benefit from the book.

Thank you for your participation in this creative project!

Claire Mandeville

TAKE A LOOK NOW AT A SAMPLE PAGE FROM THE EBOOK!

 

Jerusalem Artichokes

Photo credit: Angelyn Whitmeyer/www.IdentifyThatPlant.com

The time is approaching to harvest Jerusalem artichokes.  We have lots of these “sunchokes” growing in our gardens. Early in the spring they emerged as a lush carpet of green, rising up tall with small sun-flowers at their crown.

By late summer (early September) here in the Carolinas, the plants are falling over, and beginning to die back.  Once there is a hard frost, the sunchokes are ready to harvest and eat.

In an article titled “Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It,  Megan Saynisch explores the unique culture of this distinctive tuber, which is a member of the sunflower family.

Nutritionally, Jerusalem artichokes are high in iron, potassium, and thiamine.  The principle storage carbohydrate immediately after harvest is inulin, which is converted in the digestive tract to fructose rather than glucose. OliveandHerb.com has a recipe for Easy Roasted Sunchoke Fries. One of my favorite ways to eat these sweet sunchokes is simply to steam them, and toss them with a bit of olive oil, garlic and sea salt. Or you can dip them in horseradish sauce, or a lemon-butter sauce.

What are your favorite ways to eat Jerusalem artichokes?

Useful Foraging Resource

Do you have an interest in foraging for edible wild plants?

Are you particularly interested in medicinal plants?

If you answered yes to either of these questions, I think you will find this new resource very useful and accurate. Angelyn Whitmeyer, on her Identify That Plant Foraging Resources webpage, states that this list is “meant to be a starting point for you to put you in touch with some of the best available material.” It includes listings of books and websites for both medicinal and edible wild plants, as well as some resources for edible wild plant recipes.

And while you’re at it, look around the rest of the site.  It is a plant lover’s dream come true!

Click here to visit the Edibles Foraging Resource page.  ENJOY!  And leave a comment to tell our readers about your experience.